What are the "best" sunscreen ingredients?

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  • edited October 2016

    Question regarding PAO

    My derm's sunscreen had been used infrequently... and i only learnt about PAO recently. The PAO is 6 months. i opened it on 7/2/2016 

    it contains pure minerals sunscreen and i have only kept it in a cool dark cupboard.Any idea if it is ok to use. i forget how long i had it for. probably a year! Is it ok to use?

    (Active: 16% Zinc Oxide + 4% Titanium Dioxide) Water, Polyglyceryl-4 Isostearate, Cetyl PEG/PPG 10/1 Dimethicone, Hexyl Laurate, Aluminum Hydroxide, Stearic Acid, Cyclomethicone, Isononyl Isononanoate, Cetyl Dimethicone, PEG-150/Decyl Alcohol SMDI Copolymer, Methyl Glucose Sesquistearate, Phenoxyethanol, Methylparaben, Ethylparaben, Butylparaben, Propylparaben, Isobutylparaben, Sodium Chloride, Red #6, Iron Oxides, Yellow #10.

    thank you!
  • Sharing Swatch of Invisible Zinc SPF50+ for Face+Body to compare the white cast.

    click here for swatch

    not much white cast, and not too oily.
  • @Peter Could you explain what your criteria photoallergenic mean?
  • edited October 2016
    Your skin can show an allergic reaction under influence of sunlight in combination with external substances like sunscreen actives, from all allergic testings it appears some uv filters give more problems than others (benzophenone-3 is a common one). Maybe you can search the following terms on google: PACD, photoallergic reaction, contact allergy, sunscreen. Many articles will explain what you want to know.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22283432
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25384223
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23340396
    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/730096
  • @ preciousia - I actually live on the East Coast of the US. Our climate is very moderate here, not terribly hot in the summer and not terribly cold in the winter.  We have traveled to some very hot and humid climates and I found the Blue Lizard to be just as good a product in those situations as it is here.  :)
  • edited October 2016
    @Peter BRAVO! dank je 

    some reading for me to do



    @lindygirl1960 you make me very curious to try Blue Lizard :) I am desperately trying to use up my Moogoo sunscreen first.

    ps: is Cotz popular where you are?
      
  • edited October 2016
    @ Peter

    Could you advise if this is a good document to use to see what are the sunscreen ingredients approved in Europe?


    refer to Annexe VI
  • @Peter,

    Thank you for your suggestions about sunscreen products, such as uncover and derma. However, it seems it is unaccessible to these European products for American people. Do you have any recommendation sunscreen that could be easily accessible for American? 
  • @preciousia ;
    As far as I can see the data in the article is complete. You may have noticed that Zinc Oxide is not allowed as UV-filter, just like some older filters like PABA and Cinoxate.

    Well, the products from Paula's Choice are not bad. 
    And also the following products are oke I think:
    - Coola Matte Tint SPF30
    - Neostrata Sheer Physical Protection SPF50
    - MD solar science Mineral Creme SPF30
    - DermaQuest Sheerzinc SPF30

    But if you have INCI-lists I can check them for you.


  • @Peter Thank you for the confirmation.  :)

    i didn't notice that Zinc Oxide is not allowed *shocked*
  • edited October 2016
    @Peter Invisible Zinc has replied me with their ingredients.  I have updated it here

    what do you think of it?

    Invisible Zinc Face + Body Sunscreen SPF50
    Zinc oxide, 1,2-Hexanediol, Beeswax – white, Butyloctyl salicylate, C12-15 alkyl benzoate, Caprylyl glycol, Caprylyl methicone, Cetyl phosphate, Dicaprylyl carbonate, Dimethicone/methicone  copolymer, Dimethicone 350, Disodium edetate, Dow Corning 5200 Formulation Aid (PI), Ethylhexyl methoxycrylene, Glycerol, Magnesium sulphate, PEG-30 dipolyhydroxystearate, Phenoxyethanol, Propylene carbonate, Silica - colloidal anhydrous, Stearalkonium hectorite, Sunspheres LCG Polymer (PI), Triacontanyl PVP, Water – purified, ZinClear-IM_50AB (PI)
     
    Invisible Zinc Tinted Daywear SPF30+
    Zinc oxide, Cyclomethicone, Dow Corning 5200 Formulation Aid (PI), Phenyl trimethicone, Sodium chloride, Sunspheres LCG Polymer (PI), Phenoxyethanol, Caprylyl Glycol, Water – purified, ZinClear-IM_50AB (PI) , Exasperse Black R3619 , Exasperse Brown R3622 , Exasperse Russet R3236 , Exasperse Tan R3620, Exasperse Yellow R3235
     
    Invisible Zinc 4 HR Water Resistant SPF50+
    Zinc oxide, ZinClear-IM_50AB , 1,2-Hexanediol, Beeswax , Butyloctyl salicylate, C12-15 alkyl benzoate, Caprylyl glycol, Caprylyl methicone, Cetyl phosphate, Dicaprylyl carbonate, Dimethicone/methicone copolymer, Dimethicone, Disodium edetate, Dow Corning 5200 Formulation Aid , Ethylhexyl methoxycrylene, Glycerol, Magnesium sulfate, PEG-30 dipolyhydroxystearate, Phenoxyethanol, Propylene carbonate, Silica - colloidal anhydrous, Stearalkonium hectorite, Sunspheres LCG Polymer , Triacontanyl PVP, Water - purified.

    Invisible Zinc Facial Moisturiser SPF30
    Zinc oxide, 1,3-Butylene glycol, C12-15 alkyl benzoate, Cetearyl glucoside, Cetostearyl alcohol, Citric acid - anhydrous, Citrus limon, Cyclomethicone, Diazolidinylurea, Disodium edetate, Fumaria officinalis, Fumaric acid, Glycerol, Isostearyl neopentanoate, Methyl glucose sesquistearate, PEG-20 methyl glucose sesquistearate, Phenoxyethanol, Water - purified, Xanthin gum


    This is what they said about he moisturiser containing lemon

    "According to our medical team, it is unlikely that citrous limon will cause photosensitivity, firstly due to the minute amount that is in the formulation and secondly due to the fact that this product is a sunscreen, so hypothetically speaking, if citrous limon was photosensitising, the effect would be attenuated by the sunscreen."
  • edited October 2016
    First of all that's complete nonsense what they say about the lemon extract, if it's photosensitizing (which it is) it will cause problems under influence of UV-light.

    Well I don't know what the following ingredients are: Exasperse Black R3619 , Exasperse Brown R3622 , Exasperse Russet R3236 , Exasperse Tan R3620, Exasperse Yellow R3235, so I can't say much about that. 
    The other ingredients seem to be okay, although Diazolidinyl Urea isn't a very good preservative.
  • edited October 2016
    @Peter yup... hogwash indeed! Citrus ingredients even at Low % will affect photo sensitivity

    Koreans use lots of weird ingredients we are unfamiliar with in the Western world!

    Preservatives are necessary... I don't know much about them tbh. Personally I use phenoxyethanol in my DIY as I noticed them used in my derm's products. Not for the purist but easier to formulate with than the "natural" preservatives

    Looks like only the moisturiser has Urea... so the other 3 are ok

    I am not sure how I feel about their Zinc Oxide that isn't coated tho the Australia TGA says it is safe
  • Urea is actually a good ingredient, Diazolidinyl Urea is a formaldehyde releasing preservative, something you don't want in your cosmetics. Phenoxyethanol is actually allowed in "natural" cosmetics.
  • @Peter yes. Urea and Diazolidinyl Urea are different. 

    I know "formaldehyde" almost as a dirty word. What are the implications of it?

    >Phenoxyethanol is actually allowed in "natural" cosmetics.
    gee i didn't know that. Thanks for sharing!
  • I know it frequently causes allergies, irritation and in animal studies it has proven to be carcinogenic.
  • @Peter Yikes! Carcinogenic isn't acceptable  :-S

    i found this on Diazolidinyl Urea 

    Safety Measures/Side Effects:

    A lot of controversy surrounds the safety of diazolidinyl urea. Many believe it to be both toxic and carcinogenic, mainly due to the fact that it's a proven formaldehyde releaser. However, the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel evaluated the available data on this ingredient (and reevaluated it in 2006) and concluded it as safe to use on cosmetic products at a maximum concentration of .5%. Their studies demonstrated it to be neither toxic nor photosensitizing. However, tests did show it to produce mild skin irritations in some (1 out of 1000), so this ingredient should probably avoided by those with very sensitive skin.

    source

  • edited October 2016
    Yeah well, from all preservatives I believe the following are the worst ones:
    • methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone
    • quaternium-15
    • 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diolaka (AkaBronopol)
    • diazolidinyl urea
    • imidazolidinyl urea
    • DMDM Hydantoin
    But I don't think any cosmetic product is really dangerous. With the allowed concentrations, the side effects of all cosmetic ingredients are most of the time so extremely minimal. But for example with the sunscreen filters, I think you are certainly able to say some have fewer side effects than others. And in that view, I don't get it why companies still want to use some filters (like Benzophenone-3 or Homosalate). The FDA is simply too slow with admitting new filters, although the FDA does some very strict testing which also has it advantages. 
  • @Peter  OMG :-O


    the length of the first preservative is so long... it reminds me of supercalifragilisticexpialidocious!



  • What do you think of Parabens? Some people avoid them completely whereas i am not too sure.

    The WORST
    Propylparaben (7)
    Butylparaben (7)
    Isobutylparaben (7)

    MODERATE
    Methylparaben (4)
    Ethylparaben (4)
    Polyparaben (5)

    LEAST
    Phenoxyethylparaben (1)
    Benzylparaben (2)
    Penylparaben (1)



  • edited November 2016
    Well they appear to be safe at the allowed concentrations, and certainly Methyl and Ethylparaben are the least worrying. But personally I rather use other preservatives, because there have been some studies indicating parabens may induce skin damge under influence of uv-light. And there is still some concern about the endocrine disrupting properties of Propylparaben and Butylparaben. For a complete overview you could read the complete opinion on parabens in this article:
  • Any idea who ships Invisible Zinc to Europe? Found it on eBay but the shipping is craaazy.
  • @Doffy90 You could check with Invisible Zinc directly for stockist. They are responsive on Fb
  • @Peter Thanks for the article! 

    Preservatives are a necessary evil i suppose. I don't like the natural ingredients which can end up with product going bad easily. 

    Parabens seems to be ok, similar ot you, it's not my fave. i would avoid Isobutylparaben , Propylparaben and Butylparaben

  • @Preciousia
    I don't think parabens are a big problem either, as you say preservatives are a necessary evil. But a product that has gone bad is even worse for your skin. Personally I avoid the 6/7 preservatives I mentioned on 31 october, and concerning parabens, well if they are in a rinse of product it's no problem. I did find some other sunscreens from Ultrasun btw.

    Ultrasun Anti-age SPF50+ PA++++
    Aqua, Isostearyl Isostearate, Methylene Bis-Benzotriazolyl Tetramethylbutylphenol (Nano), Pentylene Glycol, Glycerin, Ethylhexyl Triazone, Titanium Dioxide (Nano), Bis-Ethylhexyloxyphenol Methoxyphenyl Triazine, Diethylamino Hydroxybenzoyl Hexyl Benzoate, Ethylhexyl Salicylate, C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Squalane, Polyacrylate Crosspolymer-6, Cocoglycerides, Hydrogenated Phosphatidylcholine, Ectoin, Silica, Vitis Vinifera Seed Extract, Ascorbyl Glucoside, Olea Europaea Leaf Extract, Zinc Pca, Cetyl Phosphate, Alcohol, T-Butyl Alcohol, Ascorbic Acid, Lecithin, Tocopheryl Acetate, Ascorbyl Tetraisopalmitate, Tocopherol, Diisopropyl Adipate, Ubiquinone.
  • edited November 2016
    @Peter well said. The beautybrains had said this many times too. I rather a product is preserved than a product that goes bad and causes more harm than good! Just what you said to.

    Will take note of the preservatives you mentioned. :) Thank you again for sharing your knowledge.



  • edited November 2016


    Ultrasun Anti-age SPF50+ PA++++


    gosh this sunscreen looks really good!



    Active ingredients:

    • Tinosorb M (Methylene Bis-Benzotriazolyl Tetramethylbutylphenol (Nano)
      • Photodegradation: none Hormonal activity: none absorption: none free radicals: none photoallergenic: only to decyl glucoside Dalton: 659
    • Uvinul T 150 (Ethylhexyl Triazone)
      • Uvinul T150 (Ethylhexyl Triazone, EHT, Octyltriazone), Photodegradation: very little 4% Hormonal activity: none absorption: none free radicals: some photoallergenic: unlikely Dalton: 823
    • Titanium Dioxide (Nano)
      • Photodegradation: none Hormonal activity: none absorption: Not known for sure free radicals: yes photoallergenic: no Dalton: 80
    • Tinosorb S (Bis-Ethylhexyloxyphenol Methoxyphenyl Triazin)
      • Photodegradation: none Hormonal activity: none absorption: none free radicals: none photoallergenic: no Dalton: 692
    • Uvinul A Plus (Diethylamino Hydroxybenzoyl Hexyl Benzoate)
      • Photodegradation: none Hormonal activity: none absorption: none free radicals: none photoallergenic: no Dalton: 398
    • Octyl Slicylate
      • Photodegradation: some 30% Hormonal activity: none absorption: some free radicals: none photoallergenic: no Dalton: 250

    I like:


    - Squalane

    - Vitis Vinifera Seed Extract,  grapeseed extract

    - Vitamin C (Ascorbyl Glucoside, Ascorbic Acid, Ascorbyl Tetraisopalmitate)

    - Olea Europaea Leaf Extract, 

    - Zinc PCA

    - Lecithin

    - Vitamin E 

    - Ubiquinone


    all these antioxidants will be useful to protect against Infrared radiation from the sun.

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  • edited November 2016
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    @Peter


    Ultrasun Anti-age SPF50+ PA++++


    gosh this sunscreen looks really good!


    Active ingredients:

    • Tinosorb M (Methylene Bis-Benzotriazolyl Tetramethylbutylphenol (Nano)
      • Photodegradation: none Hormonal activity: none absorption: none free radicals: none photoallergenic: only to decyl glucoside Dalton: 659
    • Uvinul T 150 (Ethylhexyl Triazone)
      • Uvinul T150 (Ethylhexyl Triazone, EHT, Octyltriazone), Photodegradation: very little 4% Hormonal activity: none absorption: none free radicals: some photoallergenic: unlikely Dalton: 823
    • Titanium Dioxide (Nano)
      • Photodegradation: none Hormonal activity: none absorption: Not known for sure free radicals: yes photoallergenic: no Dalton: 80
    • Tinosorb S (Bis-Ethylhexyloxyphenol Methoxyphenyl Triazin)
      • Photodegradation: none Hormonal activity: none absorption: none free radicals: none photoallergenic: no Dalton: 692
    • Uvinul A Plus (Diethylamino Hydroxybenzoyl Hexyl Benzoate)
      • Photodegradation: none Hormonal activity: none absorption: none free radicals: none photoallergenic: no Dalton: 398
    • Octyl Slicylate
      • Photodegradation: some 30% Hormonal activity: none absorption: some free radicals: none photoallergenic: no Dalton: 250
  • edited November 2016
    @Preciousia
    Ectoin is also a very good active which protects against sun damage (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15452409/). The other ingredients are probably added at low concentrations 0.01-0.1%, so it's nice the product doensn't contain irritants, is packaged airless and is well preserved, but I guess you can't expect much from the antioxidants.
    I must say my sunscreen list is quite abbreviated. Really you could write a book of 100 pages on every sunscreen. But still, the more I read, the more I think the list is okay in general:

    Avoid:
    - Octocrylene (easily absorbed by skin, forms free radicals, allergy rates are rising, after certain amount of time it generates more free radicals than no sunscreen)
    - Homosalate (hormone disruptor, easily abo
    - Benzophenone-3 (strong allergen, very easily absorbed by skin, endocrine disruptor, photocarcinogenic, it's almost never used in Europe anymore if its used product needs special label stating product contains Oxybenzone, because of its allergenic nature)
    - Ethylhexyl Methoxycinnamte (easily absorbed, endocrine disruptor)
    - Enzacamene (4-Methylbenzylidene Camphor, already banned in Europe)
    - Benzyl Salicylate (mostly added as fragrance)
    - 3-benzylidene Camphor

    Best:
    - Tinosorb S (extremely stable, no absorption and no allergic reactions thus far)
    - Mexoryl XL (stable, not absorbed)
    - Uvasorb HEB (improved version of Uvinal T150)
    - Uvinal A Plus (extremely effective stable UVA sunscreen, reduces formation of free radicals in sunlight very effectively, although particles are smaller than 500 dalton)
    - Neo Heliopan AP (stable UVA filter)
    - Tinosorb M (very stable, reflects, scatters and absorbs, it's a hybrid sunscreen, considered the only real alternative to physical sunscreens without any skin absorption, the only downside is that some people are allergic to decyl glycoside, which is the surfactant that keeps the particles in suspension)
    - Mexoryl SX (it is not completely stable, but still very good safety profile)
    - Uvinal T150 (one of the most efficient UVB filters)


    Oke:
    -Titanium Dioxide (when nano (or micronized) and uncoated it is extremely reactive/catalytic (ROS-production), most companies use the rutile form which is less reactive, still there is discussion if it gets absorbed and how stable the coatings are, reflects and absorbs UV radiation. Non nano forms appear to have far less safety concerns and mainly reflect uv, although hardly any company uses real non nano titanium dioxide, even if they claim they do (most just refer to the mean clustered particle size). Depending on regulations in your country different definitions of nano exist, in the worst case 49% is still in the nano range, while it may be labelled as non-nano. Larger companies are more reliable in their labelling. A non-nano sunscreen must appear extremely white on skin.
    - Zinc Oxide (less reactive, but there are more concerns about skin absorption compared to titanium dioxide, not approved in EU yet, but considering most studies say on healthy skin it will stay in the top skin layer approval in the EU is expected, however it is expected on abraded/shaved and even stretched skin over longer periods some amount will get absorbed, also via hair follicles. If the particles get absorbed till the viable skin layers free radical formation may cause skin damage. It's not as white as Titanium Dioxide, so it's more believable some companies use non-nano zinc oxide, but still the product should appear very white on skin in that case. Compared to Titanium Dioxide it's safer)
    -Phenylbenzimidazole Sulfonic Acid (Non greasy UVB filter, although may produce free radicals and allergy has been observed)
    - Ethylhexyl Salicylate (some skin penetration and not completely stable, but in general oke safety profile)
    - Polysilicone-15 (unlikely to cause any allergic reactions)
  • edited November 2016
    @Peter  Ectoin is new to me! :) 

    Neo Heliopan AP (stable UVA filter)
    - approved in Australia
    - AKA Disodium phenyl dibenzimidazole tetrasulfonate

    also new :)

    Is this the 

    Regarding Ethylhexyl Salicylate, you mentioned 30% photodegradation and some skin penetration. How do you assess the safety profile?


    http://cen.acs.org/articles/93/i20/Decade-FDA-Still-Wont-Allow.html hehe "Saying no, they say, means FDA will never have to say it is sorry.  "
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