Sunscreens that don't contain SPF

I'm curious about sun care products that don't contain SPF, like Institute Esthederm's products.  They claim to work by building resistance to the sun vs. working like traditional SPF's.  I haven't been able to use ingredients like Avobenzone/Oxybenzone because they make my skin sting, especially on my face.  I've had better luck with Titanium dioxide/Zinc oxide but I still have some stinging with those as well.  How would an SPF free product work to keep me from burning ( I am very pale) on days where I am exposed to the sun for a long period of time? And would they work better than traditional sunscreens? Institiute Esthederm also claims to build resistance for very sensitive skin types. Can anyone substantiate these claims?

Comments

  • edited April 22
    I've never heard of this brand but I took a quick look and found the ingredient list for one of their products. The ingredient list (see below) shows that it contains zinc oxide and titanium dioxide which are known UV protectants. I can't tell how much it contains but if there's a sufficient level that could explain how they substantiate their claims. I'm not sure how a product like this can be worth $50 though...

  • I'm curious then, how they try to claim they build resistance to the sun so you can use less over time if the ingredients are the same as most physical sunscreens. http://www.beautybay.com/skincare/institutesthederm/sunintolerancehighprotectionfacecream/
    This link shows an ingredient list of the product I was thinking of.
    http://www.esthederm.com/en/sun-1/high-protection-and-sun-intolerance-care/sun-intolerance-treatment-face-cream.html This link shows the claim that it can be used every hour the first 3 days then every 2 hours on the 4th - 7th days until skin builds a tolerance. Titanium dioxide is listed in the ingredients. Can claims of building tolerance really be made with these ingredients?
  • As far as I know the only "tolerance" your skin builds up is to develop a tan which produces melanin which protects your skin (to some degree.) 

    According to their website they have a patent on this but I haven't been able to track it down yet. If I can find anything out I'll let you know but I'm very skeptical that they really have differentiated technology. 
  • Thank you for all your help.  I really can't see spending $50+ for a product I can get in a drugstore for $7. 
  • Yeah, I'd personally steer clear of anyone who markets a sunscreen product without SPF.  There is no such thing, and it makes me suspicious of everything else they might claim about their products.
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