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Year end wrap up – episode 204

Happy New Year!

We take a look at some of the hottest trends in the beauty industry in 2019 including clean beauty, CBD, Indie beauty and waterless beauty. Then we give our predictions for the hottest trends coming in 2020.

We’ll get back to answering beauty questions in our next show.

Follow the Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.  

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

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On today’s episode we’re going to be answering your beauty questions about 

  1. Quality of ingredients versus price of the product?
  2. The Curly Girl Method and Parabens?
  3. What it’s like to work in the cosmetics industry
  4. Do you have to wait after applying Vitamin C?

Beauty Science News stories

Is your old makeup is contaminated? 
Here’s an interesting story which should be a wake up call to anyone who uses products that say “no preservatives” or preservative free.  It turns out even products that don’t contain water have been found to be contaminated with potentially harmful microbes.  

In this study publish in the October issue of the Journal of Applied Microbiology, researchers wanted to investigate the nature and extent of microbial contamination in five categories of used cosmetic products (lipstick, lip gloss, eyeliners, mascaras and beauty blenders) and highlight the potential risk posed to consumers in the UK.

The got samples of used products donated by consumers and analyzed them for the microbial contents.  This was done by taking a sample, plating them on microbial culture plates and then letting them grow.  Surprisingly, they found that anywhere from 79–90% of all used products were contaminated with bacteria, with bacterial loads ranging between 102 and 103 CFU per ml, beauty blenders contained an average load of >106 CFU per ml. Presence of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Citrobacter freundii were detected. Fungi were also detected in all product types, and were prevalent in beauty blenders (26·58 and 56·96% respectively). Ninety‐three per cent of beauty blenders had not been cleaned and 64% had been dropped on the floor and continued to be used.

The researchers concluded that significant levels of microbial contamination occur during use of cosmetic products and presence of pathogenic organisms pose a potential risk to health.

Now, I suppose most of these products passed microbial challenge tests or were not tested because the manufacturer has the mistaken notion that products that don’t contain water do not need preservatives. But this is not true.  Don’t listen to marketers who say preservative free or even paraben free.

You should only use cosmetics that have preservatives. It is the much safer option as this study demonstrates.

Survey Says – Our Eyelids are Itchier Than Ever
According to research published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Americans are typing in the keyword “itch” to the tune of more than 18 million—with the skin on the eye/eyelids appearing at the top of the list with 3 million hits.

Two dermatologists were interviewed, where one dermatologist advocated one should avoid touching their eyelids if they’re irritated, and one should apply Aquaphor sparingly. If it gets too bad, there are prescription topicals available to ease the itch. The other dermatologist stated that you should buy his balm, which contains 1% hydrocortisone and NO irritating ingredients that other OTC hydrocortisones contain, like alcohol and petrolatum. 

While the dermatologist is in his rights to recommend hydrocortisone cream, and it’s convenient he recommends his own, he should know better that petrolatum is not an irritating ingredient. Petrolatum is actually recommended and approved by the FDA as a skin protectant. Furthermore, most creams don’t contain alcohol, as in isopropyl alcohol. They contain fatty alcohols that help structure the product to make it a cream. These are not drying and not irritating.

Beauty Questions

Question 1: Charolette – My esthetician tells me that price difference is due to the quality of the ingredients. Is that due to the quality of the ingredient?  Is that true?

No, it’s not true and let us tell you why.

Question 2: Helen asks – Hi beauty brains! I’ve started following the curly girl method, and while i’m not sure if all of the claims are well founded, but  i will say that it has sorted my itchy flakey scalp out, so i will stick with it either way. I know that we are to avoid silicones that can’t be washed out without SLS, and we shouldn’t use drying alcohols and SLS, but i’ve never heard what hair benefit avoiding parabens is meant to bring. Are they just on the ‘we hate parabens’ train? What is the claim here and is the claim correct?

Question 3: I am 28 and am considering going back to school to study chemistry and enter the cosmetic chemistry field. This would be my second B.S.  (the first being in Textiles and Apparel). I was hoping I could ask you a few questions to get an idea of what the industry is like. In your experiences, is a masters needed or will a bachelors in biochemistry or general chemistry be enough to secure a job in the industry? What are the daily tasks of a cosmetic chemist like? Is it extremely competitive to place with a company or is there a lot of opportunity? Any advice you can provide will be greatly appreciated. Looking forward to the next show!

Question 4: Love your podcast — I wish I’d known about it when I first started exploring skincare! My question is about whether it is necessary to wait 15-30 minutes after applying vitamin C. I tend to wait for at most 5 minutes due to being in a rush. Have I been diluting the effect of the vitamin C, or is the wait time a myth? Online resources seem to differ on this, and I’d really appreciate your input from a scientific perspective! Thanks so much, Sonia

Follow the Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.  

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

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On today’s episode we just felt like ranting!

Today we cover 3 beauty science topics that have affected the beauty world. Here you’ll get the cosmetic chemist and formulator take on the following topics:

  1. Hair dye and a link to cancer
  2. Waterless formulas and whether they are superior
  3. CBD – is it really linked to smoking weed?

Beauty Science News stories

Hair dye linked to cancer – should you be worried?

Waterless beauty products – are they better?

CBD in cosmetics – why is this ingredient linked to drugs? Also, does it do anything?

Follow the Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.  

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

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On today’s episode we’re going to be answering your beauty questions about 

  1. Is meadowfoam seed oil making skin less itchy?
  2. Can rinse off conditioner give you acne?
  3. Does Este Lauder own Bobbie Brown?
  4. What is Indie Beauty?
  5. What’s the deal with oils and hair?

Beauty Science News stories

What do you make of these “waiting lists” ?  

Why Tata Harper Put 72 Active Ingredients into 1 Glowifying Super-Serum

Beauty Questions

Question 1: Dear beauty brains I have keratosis Polaris on my cheeks and I have tried many products over my 50 years currently the best night time moisturizer is a pricey product by fresh called cram in seeing that contains metal foam seat oil as the first ingredient the hype of the production is noted I also use clearance gentle day cream but it is not as good as the fresh product what is it about meadow foam seed oil that helps with keeping my skin from itching and becoming inflamed? thank you so much and I really enjoy this podcast

Product discussed:  https://www.sephora.com/product/creme-ancienne-P42592

Question 2: KH wants to know – Can Rinse Out Conditioner Give You Acne?

Question 3: Hello The Beauty Brain! I have been listening to your podcast for 2 years now and I so enjoy learning the true FACTS. Hard to find the true facts at times these days. I have a question regarding Bobbie Brown 50SPF primer. I think Estée Lauder owns BB? True? Not True? Also I am wondering where else I can find another less expensive brand of primer at a 50 SPF level out there? Elf has one but it is waaayyy too light for my olive skin. Thank you for your great show! Gerry

Question 4: Deepa asks – in (a previous) episode you talked about clean beauty. I agree about the vegan or clean brands not being that much different from the bigger brands. What is an “indie” brand? I’ve heard this term but don’t really understand how it differentiates from vegan, clean, organic etc.

Question 5: Kinskihair from Instagram asks, Hi there! I’m a current hairstylist. With all the YouTubing, are oils beneficial to healthy hair and hair growth? I see a lot of DIY products and love the idea of using natural products, but is this wise? I try to promote healthy hair and want to use what is best, especially when it comes to relaxed or natural hair. The beauty business has become so overly saturated with products. It’s overwhelming.

Follow the Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.  

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

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Covered on this episode:

Beauty Science stories:

Cruelty free products are free from cruelty.

EWG on the Kardashian’s show

Beauty Questions:

Are human stem cells effective in anti-aging products?

Coincidentally, I just read a story about a new skin care product that incorporates both plant and human “stem cells.” This type of marketing is a bit annoying because it’s completely misleading. There aren’t stem cells in the product no matter what this company claims about their skin cream.

How do I know this? Well, all you have to do is know a little about the science of stem cells and it becomes clear. So let’s talk about stem cells.

Stem cells are living cells that are undifferentiated. They’re a bit like the cells that start every embryo when the sperm and egg cells fuse. They contain all the DNA information to make an entire human being (or plant or other animal depending on the species). When embryos start to grow, most of their cells differentiate into things like skin cells, brain cells, heart cells, and all the other different organs in your body. While nearly every cell in your body has the same DNA material, the DNA code is expressed differently so you end up getting the different organs. It’s like your DNA is one big recipe book and the organs are made by following different recipes in the same book. This is called cellular differentiation.

Stem cells do not differentiate in this way. They maintain their potential to become any type of organ. They also have an unlimited ability to divide and live. See most differentiated human cells can only divide about 50 generations before they die. They are subject to the Hayflick limit and have a built-in program that kills them off. Scientists theorize this prevents cancer.

But Stem cells, are not restricted as such. That’s why they are so promising for curing diseases or regrowing organs. Imagine if you could take some of your own skin stem cells and grow new patches of your own skin from them in a lab. You could use that skin to cover scars or other tissue damage. You could even get rid of wrinkles or signs of aging skin. It’s this potential that makes them a promising treatment for antiaging products.

It’s also a misunderstanding of this potential that has duped consumers and inspired marketers to put them into skin care formulations. So you might be wondering, if a stem cell could reverse aging, why wouldn’t you do it?

I’ll tell you why.

Because stem cells only work if they are living. And living stem cells are not being put into these skin creams. If they were, they would have to have a special growth medium and be kept at a specific temperature. They would need to be refreshed with food too. Stem cell containing creams are not created as such. At best you have a cream filled with dead stem cells that have no potential to do anything.

Plant stem cells

Plant stem cells in a skin cream is even more baffling to me. These are stem cells that come from plants and have the potential to grow stems, leaves, fruits, etc. Why would anyone think that a plant stem cell is going to be able to help improve the appearance or condition of your skin? It is nonsensical.

The reason companies put them in formulas however, is because they can claim the product has stem cells (which consumer like I guess) and the ingredients can be obtained inexpensively. Human stem cells would be pretty pricey and probably illegal. This isn’t a problem with apple stem cells. So marketers figure if people like stem cells in their products, it doesn’t matter what type of stem cells they are.

In this, they are right. But only because the type of stem cell in your cosmetic doesn’t matter. No type of stem cell added to your skin lotion will do much of anything!

Of course, I should add that stem cells are a promising technology for the future. And they may even be a great anti-aging treatment when the science catches up with the application. You will know when it is a real anti-aging treatment when the following things are true.

The stem cells are from humans (preferably yourself)

The stem cells are alive

The product is somehow delivered to your dermis (probably an injection)

The product is applied by a doctor

If stem cells really worked the way they are promised, this treatment would be beyond a cosmetic one and well into the drug category. It just might happen in the next 20 years but any cream that is advertised to be anti-aging because it contains stem cells now is about as effective as all the skin creams without stem cells.

Kelly asks : What hair dyes cover gray the best?

Kim asks  – Why do people think “All Natural” is better?

Shereen asks Does silicon damage curly hair?

Remember to check out our new Instagram account.

Follow us on Twitter.

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The Beauty Brains answer questions about…

  • Why can’t I find more fragrance-free hair products?
  • Living Proof hair care (is the price worth it?)
  • What’s the deal with No-BS Skincare
  • Can magnesium be used for cleaning?

Beauty News

Skin care in the dairy aisle – will probiotics help strengthen skin and hair? There isn’t a lot of evidence to say it will.

Tom’s launches toothpaste tube that’s recyclable – will the other brands owned by Colgate follow suit?

Social media

On this Instagram post we debated the idea that parabens are perfectly safe for cosmetics. There is ample evidence they are safe and not much evidence that they are unsafe. What do you think?

Beauty Questions

Question 1: Karyn – I have allergies to fragrance and I can’t find a good shampoo or conditioner that works well but doesn’t have fragrance. What are your thoughts on this?

Question 2: Hello Perry and Valerie (The Beauty Brains!).  I really enjoy your podcast – thank you for all you do to keep me and all of your listeners informed. I was wondering whether you could do a review of the hair care brand Living Proof. I currently use their color care line, and I like it, but all of their products are so pricey. Do any of their claims justify the expense? They are now owned by Unilever and I’m wondering whether there is a less expense Unilever option (or any other brand) you could compare Living Proof products. To add to the above, can you comment on whether colored or highlighted hair needs special products at all? Thanks again! Thäis.

Question 3: Carissa says – there is a new line of beauty products, called No B.S. Skin Care, and I was wondering what your take on it was.  They claim to only use ingredients that work, and that are not harmful. It would be wonderful to hear your thoughts on these products, and a podcast on it would really make my day!  😉 Thanks for your time and consideration! Have a great day!

Question 4: Jas asks, There’s a new detergent replacement in the market from japan called Terra Wash Mg. It’s magnesium enclosed in a package and supposedly can be used for 365 washes. I wonder if it’s true and effective? Would appreciate your thoughts.

Link to show notes

Follow the Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.  

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

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The Beauty Brains answer questions about…

  • Should you take collagen supplements?
  • Is there a difference between men & women’s hair care?
  • Is tea tree oil is as effective as benzoyl peroxide
  • Can Vitamin C change color?

Beauty News

Natural cosmetic act is introduced in congress (in the US)

The purple hair challenge is going viral – I have no idea why

Beauty Questions

Question 1: KH says – Hi. Is there any difference in the formulas besides fragrance? Suave Professional Men Daily Clean Shampoo says “Refreshing Shampoo made specifically for men’s hair”  Is this BS? Thanks.

Question 2: Kristin – Is tea tree oil as effective as benzoyl peroxide at removing blemishes? You don’t have to dilute it in a carrier oil as with other essential oils?  How true is this?

Question 3:

Hello BB,  I am a new subscriber to your podcasts and have been learning so much from binge-listening to past episodes. I wonder if you can look at the information in the following link and comment on some of the claims made. I take supplements sporadically – usually when in winter (we’re getting into that season in England now). I have tried collagen supplements in the past but found it made no difference to my skin. I continue to take vitamin c, d and sometimes a multivitamin as an ‘insurance policy’. Am I wasting my money?  Thank you.

Question 4: I recently came across an… interesting product from Farmacy, a brand known for its honey-based salve and mask. The product in question is the Bright On Massage-Activated Vitamin C Mask. In the description, amongst other things, they state the following: “As you massage it into your skin, the vitamin C capsules burst, turning the mask from lavender to green, so you know it’s working to bring out your brightest, most perfect skin.” I have personally never heard of Vitamin C changing color in such a manner to indicate efficacy or activation. How/why does this supposedly work, or is it just a gimmick?

Link to show notes

Follow the Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.  

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

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On today’s episode we answer your questions about  

  • Is Lucas’s Paw Paw ointment different than vaseline?
  • What does the term cosmeceutical mean? Are the products different?
  • Does nail polish help your nails to grow better?
  • Are copper peptides an effective anti-aging ingredient?
  • Shakaki DIY recipe for hair. Does it have any effect on hair? And is it safe?

Correction: We do want to make a correction on Episode 195, where we were discussing the methodology that is used in the United States to measure sunscreen efficacy. It was stated 2g/cm2 of sunscreen application are needed, that was a mistake. It’s 2mg/cm2. 

Beauty News

Are anti-aging products going to become illegal? – Two court cases may signal the end of anti-aging claims in the beauty industry.

How to Get Rid of a Hickey: 7 Easy Hacks That Actually Work

These mostly won’t work but here’s what they claim…

  1. Reduce swelling with a cold spoon.
  2. Speed up the healing process with aloe vera.  
  3. Soothe your skin with a banana peel.
  4. Promote circulation with a warm compress.
  5. Apply a vitamin C cream.
  6. Eat vitamin K-rich foods.
  7. Promote blood circulation with a toothbrush.

Beauty Questions

Question 1: Sarah asks about Lucas’s paw paw ointment.  It seems like a petroleum jelly product. Is there any research that says paw paw does something that petroleum jelly doesn’t?

Yes, it’s mostly vaseline.

Question 2: What does the term Cosmeceutical mean? Is it just marketing? What is the difference between cosmeceuticals and standard products?

Mostly, just marketing. Here’s what the FDA says about cosmeceuticals.

Question 3: Does keeping nail polish on your nails help them to grow? I’ve heard that nail polish keeps the moisture locked in on your nail bed, helping nails grow faster, longer. Also do the gel nail polish that helps to strengthen and fortify your nails actually work?

Nail polish is good for coloring your nails, not making them grow.

Question 4: Charlotte says – Are copper peptides an effective anti-aging ingredient?  Should I include it in my skin care regimen? Copper peptides uglies? Can they have the opposite effect making skin appear more aged?

There is some evidence copper peptides can improve the appearance of skin but not much better than a well formulated moisturizer.

Question 5: Misty – Shakaki DIY recipe for hair. Does it have any effect on hair? And is it safe?

Safe, but doesn’t do much good.

Link to the show notes

Follow the Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.  

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

*The dogs in the picture are Valerie’s who can be heard a little bit on the show

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On today’s episode we answer your questions about  

  • Is vaping bad for your skin
  • Is there any benefit to inverse hair conditioning
  • Do you need to worry about emulsifiers in skin products?

Beauty News

Sunday Riley – has practically no consequences to posting fake reviews.

J&J baby powder recall –  Company can’t catch a break

FDA Recall Roundup – 

Microbial contamination warning letters

Beauty Questions

Question 1 – Hi Beauty Brains! I was wondering about the “inverse hair conditioning  device” it’s kind of like a reverse hair straightener with ice and if it actually works? 

Question 2 (audio) – Is vaping as bad as smoking for your skin?

Question 3 – Do I need to worry about emulsifiers in my skin products?

Link to the show notes

Follow the Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.  

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

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On this episode of the Beauty Brains we answer a number of beauty product questions and talk about big companies and the brands they own.

Beauty Questions On today’s episode we answer your questions about  

  • Are there any benefits in putting vitamins on hair?
  • Does anything work better than hydroquinone for age spots?
  • Do shave minimizing products work?
  • Are film forming ingredients easy to wash off?

Beauty News

The Rise of Fancy Face Cream—for the Rest of Your Body

High end skincare companies are making powerful skin care creams for the body, not the face. 

Dermatologist rant! – Not everything you hear from dermatologists online can be trusted or is true. This misinformation really harms consumers. Remember, dermatologists are not necessarily formulators or know which are the best, most effective ingredients to use. They also are not unbiased, especially when they are pushing a product.

Cloud 10 – transparencyIt’s laughable that a company who sells a product that has no proven benefits is calling for transparency.

Beauty Questions

Question 1 – We need a beauty brain for vitamins !  Can you guys talk about vitamins for hair etc or any vitamins that are recommended for beauty benefits Years ago companies claimed that THEIR vitamins would break down (digestion) and other vitamin brands would not. Thank you I so enjoy your podcastGeraldine

There are not any proven benefits of vitamins in hair products. They are added because consumers like vitamins and they make them feel like the products are better.

Question 2 (audio) – Is hydroquinone effective and why don’t you see more products with it? Also, is niacinamide as effective?

Hydroquinone has been used for depigmentation since the 1960s and its use as a skin lightener is highly controversial. A widely accepted mechanism for how hydroquinone works is that it inhibits synthesis of the enzyme tyrosinase, which is an enzyme responsible for melanin production. Melanin is the molecule that gives skin its color. Additionally, melanocytes, the cells that make melanin, and organelles that contain melanin, can be destroyed. It’s pretty effective! 

However, the safety of this ingredient is a little controversial. Hydroquinone has been banned in cosmetic products in Europe since 2000. In the United States, depigmentation products are considered as over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. In Over The Counter drugs, the FDA generates a monograph that dictates what ingredients can be used and at what levels. Typically OTC products are products that induce a physiological change. Historically, since 1982, the level concluded to be safe was between 1.5% and 2.0%. However, the FDA recently withdrew the monograph listing hydroquinone as an ingredient. The FDA determined that it could not rule out potential carcinogenic risk from topically applied hydroquinone in humans, nor make a final determination on hydroquinone’s potential to impair fertility. 

The Cosmetics Ingredient Review board, which we often refer to, has been studying the safety of hydroquinone since the early 1980s and has created several reports over the years recommending restricted use in cosmetics. The CIR says they believe hydroquinone is safe at concentrations of less than or equal to 1% in formulations that are designed for discontinuous, brief use, followed by rinsing from the skin. It is unsafe for use in leave-on cosmetic products, other than in nail adhesives. 

Niacinamide does not lighten the skin, but it has shown to be effective in studies to visually help improve the appearance of fine lines and improve skin’s tone.

Question 3 – Elizabeth asks – Do topical products that claim to minimize the need for shaving work? Like this one or this one. They always suck me in because I hate shaving, but I have no idea if they’re actually worth the money. What is the ingredient in them that’s supposed to be having this effect, and how does it work, if it actually does?

No, shave minimizing products do not slow hair growth. But they can make it feel like you don’t need to shave as much. Essentially, the products are conditioning your hair which makes it feel softer and that makes you think you don’t need to shave.  Then when it says it’s clinically tested this is true. But this isn’t like real science. It’s sciency but the data is not really reliable. 

But if you like the products and it makes you feel less inclined to shave, you might like it. But it is not having an impact on the speed at which your hair grows.

Question 4 – I’ve recently been trying to eliminate silicone from my routine, but found other film-forming substances like carbomer, acrylic acid copolymer, and ammonium acryloyldimethyltaurate/vp copolymer in many of my products. Will they be easily washed off with soap and water? Do you think these other substances are better than silicone? Thank you!Suzy

We’ll answer the question presuming you’re eliminating silicone from your routine because you think it’s a film-former, and are looking at other polymers as film formers. 

Carbomer, Acrylic Acid Copolymer, Ammonium Acryloyldimethyltaurate/VP Copolymer are polymers that thicken aqueous systems. They work by being hydrated in water, tightly coiled up, then become extended upon neutralization. When they extend their polymer arms, they build a network and thicken the system. Carbomer is famous for forming clear hair gels in the 90s like LA Looks or the green aloe gel you buy at WalMart when you have a sunburn. They are relatively “senseless,” meaning you won’t feel a tacky or sticky film on the skin. In fact, I think you can barely feel they’re there.

They are thus very different from silicones; silicones are a very generic term for a class of molecules, and not all of them stay on the skin. For example, cyclopentasiloxane and certain dimethicones are extremely volatile and volatilize from the skin and hair into the atmosphere. Other dimethicones are not volatile and can form an emollient layer on the skin. 

Follow the Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.  

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

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