≡ Menu

Welcome to the Beauty Brains, a show where real cosmetic chemists answer your beauty product questions and give you an insider’s look at the cosmetic industry. This is Episode 222. Yes, that’s a palindrome!  Yeah.   I’m your host, Perry Romanowski and with me today is…well, it’s just me. Valerie is off today but she’ll be back next week.  

Meanwhile on today’s show I’m going to be answering questions about…

  • Whether the SkinDupes AI is a reliable way to pick skin care products?
  • Can you combine Vitamin C and Niacinamide?
  • Do blue light serums provide any extra benefit?
  • Whether it’s worth it to grow your own plant extracts for skin care?

Why don’t people apply sunscreen? 

I should say up front that it’s a good practice to wear sunscreen every day. It has proven benefits both with stopping the negative skin aging effects of the sun and also protecting you from the development of cancer. If you’re going outside, wear sunscreen.  

-they don’t like how it feels
-they think it causes acne
-they don’t like the white cast it leaves on the skin
-they don’t want to mess up their makeup and
-they don’t think they need it because they aren’t going to be in the sun too long.

CBD meet CBG  – CBG is the new CBD?

Beauty Product Advice

So, an efficient way to find the product that is the best value for you, which means it works well and is low cost, is to start with an inexpensive product. If the least expensive product works for you, then that’s what you should use. However, if you try that inexpensive product and you hate it, then move up to the next tier of product cost and try that out. If you don’t like that, then move up in price until you find a product that works for you.  This is the most efficient way to find the product optimized for you. 

But what that does not mean is that you should just buy the cheapest thing you can find. Some people may like VO5 or Suave shampoo. It’s cheap and it works. But a lot of people won’t like it. It may be too harsh or they don’t like the fragrance. For those people, they should move up to the next tier of shampoo. Don’t start out with a super pricing, customized product for your hair type. Because the product likely isn’t better and you can find less expensive options that will work just as well. 

Anyway, I just wanted to clarify, we here on the Beauty Brains are not telling you that you should just buy the cheapest products.  What we are telling you is that you need to experiment with products to find out what works best for you. And that a good way to start that experiment is to begin with the least expensive products. Then move up in price until you find a product that you are happy with.

Beauty Questions

Question 1My question is about the skincareskool. It’s described as the first algorithm that compares products that are similar. Is this dupe finder reliable? Can you expect similar results from products that have a high match score?  

They give a reasonable option as an alternative. Just know they are not completely unbiased or accurate.

Question 2 Shilpa says – I read online that certain actives should not be used together, specifically vitamin c and niacinamide. I read the vitamin c reacts with the niacinamide and inactivates the niacinamide. Is this true, and if so, should I apply niacinamide creams at night in rotation with my retinoids? Can they be applied together or do they react together too?

Now, about combining them in a single product. Generally, Vitamin C needs to be used at a low pH to be most effective while Niacinamide works better at a higher/neutral pH. So, there can be a problem if the pH isn’t optimized.  As far as a problem layering, no there isn’t a problem with that.  But some research done in the 1960’s had shown a negative interaction between Niacinamide and Ascorbic Acid (they can potentially react to produce nicotinic acid which can cause redness and itching).  However, that result is using pure ascorbic acid and niacinamide held at high temperatures. It’s unlikely to be a problem in modern day formulations stored at room temperature.

So is there any benefits to combining them?  They would be beneficial together in that you could get multiple effects from a single product. Niacinamide and Vitamin C fight different problems related to aging skin. Combining them also would help with skin lightening (theoretically) as they work in different ways to achieve that effect.

Question 3 – Paige asks – Is there a difference between an antioxidant serum marketed for blue light and a good antioxidant serum? Are these products actually beneficial or what are their shortcomings?

There is not really a formulation difference. They pretty much use standard anti-aging ingredients like peptides, humectants, niacinamide, etc. But there isn’t any ingredient you can formulate with that will have a measurable impact on the effect (or lack there of) that blue light has on skin.  The products are beneficial in the way that moisturizers are beneficial. But there is nothing in them that will make them measurably different in terms of the effect of blue light.

Question 4 – Mishu asks Is there no plant extract worth harvesting and using in skincare? Is synthetic always better?

To the question of whether any plant extract works to provide benefits for your skin. As a consumer you need to know up front that while cosmetic marketers frequently advertise on their bottles that there are plant extracts in the product, the reality is only a tiny amount of the extract is typically used. The formulators & marketers of the product don’t expect those extracts to have any measurable impact on performance. They are what we call “claims” ingredients and they help tell a story. They don’t make the product work. 

Now, there are lots of plants that may have benefits. Aloe juice certainly has moisturizing benefits.  And in an article titled “Botanicals in Dermatology: An Evidence-Based Review” published in the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, they point out potential benefits for a few plant extracts such as Tea Tree oil to fight acne, Glycyrrhiza, which is derived from licorice, as a treatment for atopic dermatitis and Mahonia and Capsicum for psoriasis. Of course, there is just directional evidence for these working. It hasn’t reached the level of these being prescribed as treatments.  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20509719/

Question 5Alison asks – Am I better off still using good old-fashioned petrolatum and glycerin on my face? Is hyaluronic acid just a fad?

Yeah. Glycerin is the most efficient humectant in terms of real world performance. Hyaluronic acid makes a much better story though. I think it’s just a fad although it’s an ingredient that will probably stick around because it does actually work. I just don’t think it works better than plain old glycerin. It’s a lot harder to market products that just use it, but that’s why I’m not in the beauty product selling business. If you’re using a product with petrolatum & glycerin, you can’t do much better in terms of performance.

Question 6 – Julia says – What’s up with prostaglandins used in eyelash serums? My understanding is that they are similar to the ingredients in prescription medications in effectiveness and potential side effects, but do not require the labeling or testing required of “drugs”. What gives?  

If they work, they’re illegal drugs.  Except Latisse

Question 7 – Theresa asks – Are commercially available retinol creams like La Roche-Posay Redermic R Intense with 0.3% retinol just as strong as the prescription tretinoin at 0.25% or 0.3%? What’s the difference?

The tretinoin products are proven to work. The retinol products aren’t.

Question 8Tina says “This is the list of ingredients that Monat does not use in their products: NO Parabens , SLS/SLES, Cyclic Silicones, BHT, DEA, Phthalates, Phenoxyethanol, Petrolatum, Mineral Oil, or Paraffin Wax, Triclosan, Plastic Microbeads, Formaldehyde Releasers.  Can you explain in laymen’s terms what they are/do and if they’re actually harmful? Or, is this more fear-based marketing?”

It’s fear based marketing.

Question 9 – And finally, here’s one from Kimberly  from Instagram – What is the difference between Medical grade skincare and OTC skincare? I’ve heard many so called experts say non medical grade skincare does nothing but make your skin feel nice.

OTC skin care uses proven actives to treat conditions like acne, psoriasis, eczema, etc. The ingredients and claims are regulated by the FDA (at least in the US).  In this case OTC refers to the terms Over the Counter drugs.  These are the most regulated cosmetic-type products on the market.

If you’re just referring to any product you can buy at the drug or grocery store then perhaps you mean OTC as in drug store brands. These are different and they can not, by law, treat diseases. They are classified as cosmetics and are only allowed to improve the appearance of skin and hair.

Medical grade skincare is a marketing position that has no legal meaning. Anyone can call anything they want “medical grade.” It does not refer to things that dermatologists prescribe.  It generally refers to standard cosmetic products that are sold by dermatologists, use a dermatologists name, or just take the marketing position  that they are medical grade. The reality is that these products do not have any special technology that allows them to work better or treat diseases that other cosmetic skin care brands can’t do. It is a marketing position, that’s all.

Follow the Beauty Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

{ 0 comments }

Welcome to the Beauty Brains, a show where real cosmetic chemists answer your beauty product questions and give you an insider’s look at the cosmetic industry.

Hosts: Valerie George and Perry Romanowski

On today’s show we’re going to be answering questions about…

  • Is blow drying at low heat better for your hair than air drying?
  • How important are amino acids in hair care products?
  • How do you go about studying cosmetic science?

Beauty science news:

Breaking news – J&J discontinues selling talc based baby powder!

 

Do you know any of these influencers?

SCCS publishes trio of final safety opinions on hair dye, anti-perspirant and anti-dandruff ingredients

Who is the SCCS – Scientific Committee for Consumer Safety.  It’s important to note that this group the SCCS is not funded by industry and the scientists do not work for industry. It’s also important to note that these levels of ingredients are not different than what the US allows.  More evidence that cosmetic products in the US are not less safe than those in the EU and that cosmetic products are safe to use.

Beauty Questions

Question 1 Renee – The scientist at ghd says that blow drying at low heat and speed is actually better for hair than air drying. Is this true? 

Link to product

Good question. I doubt a consumer would notice much difference.

Question 2 – Wageeda says – I have been wondering about amino acids in hair products!. I noticed amino acid used recently a lot . But is it effective?is it better to as hydrolyzed such as hydrolyzed wheat protein or as a separate amino acid such as Glutamic Acid, Histidine, Serine,  Arginine, Lysine .  Lastly, what’s the difference between amino acids  in relation to hair and what is the best one for damaged hair in leave in and masks conditioners?

Question 3 – Audio – Cyndi – Totally enamored by the chemistry behind our cosmetic products. Pro makeup artist, 53 years young. I don’t have a degree. I want to begin a college career, and eventually become a professor of cosmetic science.  Should I minor in business and marketing? If I can only choose one, which should I minor in as a future professor?

It really all comes down to what you want your career to be. If you want to become a future professor, you will have to at least get a degree related to the topic you want to teach. So, if you want to become a professor of cosmetic science, you’re going to have to get a degree in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering. Then you would likely need a Masters in the subject since undergrad degrees don’t teach much about cosmetic science. Getting a minor in Marketing would probably help more than in Business.

Follow the Beauty Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

 

{ 0 comments }

Hello & welcome to the Beauty Brains, a show where real cosmetic chemists answer your beauty product questions and give you an insider’s look at the cosmetic industry. This is episode 220.

Host:  Perry Romanowski

7 Marketing Tricks that are Costing you Money

  1. Natural product nonsense
  2. Clean beauty con
  3. Salon brand secrets
  4. The Pricing Ploy
  5. Advertising antics
  6. Flawed Influencers
  7. Subscription service shenanigans

Follow the Beauty Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

{ 2 comments }

Welcome to the Beauty Brains, a show where real cosmetic chemists answer your beauty product questions and give you an insider’s look from scientists in the cosmetic industry. 

On today’s show we’re going to be answering questions about…

  • Is the wait time necessary when you are applying acids?
  • How do you debate product safety with someone?
  • Do skin products with natural moisturizing factor work better?
  • Should you avoid glycerin and dimethicone in hair products?

And we’ll cover some beauty science news too.

Beauty Science news

What’s your stance on wearing masks?

Perry on Ecowell podcast 

J&J lawsuits get go ahead

Beauty in the time of covid

Beauty Questions

Question 1 – Shea Drury – My question is about wait times after applying acids. After cleansing about 3 nights per week, I apply Cosrx BHA Blackhead Power Liquid, wait 20 minutes, then apply Cosrx AHA Whitehead Power Liquid, wait 20 minutes, then go on with the rest of my routine. From what I’ve read, the reasoning behind waiting 20 minutes after applying the acid is that it takes 20-30 minutes to neutralize, therefore by waiting you are getting more benefit from the product, and that applying other products over acid before it has neutralized naturally will neutralize the acid. Also, the possibility of irritation is said to increase if you don’t have the wait time between the two acids. Do you think this wait time is necessary? And given that BHA is oil soluble and AHA is water soluble, which one should go first?

No, 30 minute wait time is not necessary.

Question 2 – I recently had a conversation with a makeup artist about products to clean makeup brushes. She said J&J Baby Shampoo contains harsh ingredients that are bad for the skin and for the waterways. She has created a product called Luxury Vegan Makeup Brush Soap but I don’t know ingredients well enough to tell if her product is “good” for the skin and the waterways. Do you mind weighing in or direct me to how to sort this out on my own? Thank you.

The first thing I keep in mind when discussing “this product is better than that product” with someone, is what their belief system is. This person clearly has a definition of what a “good” product for the skin is. In going to this person’s website, they think a good product is vegetable-based, sulfate-free, fragrance-free, antimicrobial and antibacterial is good. Ok, we might not agree with their definition, but we can use this definition to see if the J&J product fits the definition. In looking at the J&J product ingredient list, I can see it is not fragrance-free, although all the allergens were disclosed. All of the other requirements are met.

The second thing I do is check what they’re saying about the product to see if it’s valid. This person says J&J’s tear free shampoo has ingredients that are bad for the skin. Aside from the fact that every company is required to prove their products are safe, and certainly a company the size of J&J is doing so, what ingredients could be the culprit? There are some studies that show glucosides (of which the J&J product has Decyl and Lauryl) can be irritating, which I think can be true at high levels. That doesn’t necessarily mean this product is irritating, though. I then look at the makeup brush soap and see that it contains pentasodium pentatate. This can be non-irritating to irritating. Additionally, pentasodium pentatate is a hazardous substance that has to be declared on Safety Data Sheets. So, this person doesn’t have a leg to stand on if they want to use this as a talking point. However, pentasodium pentatate is perfectly fine when used in their product. The second thing they claim is that their product is good for the waterways. What they mean by this is that their product’s ingredients readily biodegrade when introduced into water, or that the ingredients are not harmful to aquatic life. I’m not sure if this individual has both of these in mind, but I would say this is likely true. Looking at her ingredients, this is likely true. You can find this information in Section 12 of a Safety Data Sheet. The J&J product contains EDTA, which is not readily biodegradable, but eventually will. I didn’t look up all the ingredients, but this jumps out. Keep in mind it’s important to keep in mind the safety data sheets are written for the ingredient at 100% of the concentration and you can extrapolate some things to the end product, but use caution there.

Last but not least, I ask myself what this individual would have to gain from having this view point. This person has created their own product, so of course they think it’s going to be superior to anything else on the market. 

I do want to make one final comment; this person may be referencing an older ingredient debacle that J&J had where their formula used Quaternium-15 as a preservative. This is a formaldehyde donor, and while it’s safe for use, it has gained a bad reputation. J&J came heavily under attack and was forced to reformulate under consumer pressure despite the safety of the ingredient and the product.

Luxury Vegan Makeup Brush Soap
INGREDIENTS: Aqua (Water), Glycerin, Sorbitol, Sodium Stearate, Sodium Laurate, Sodium Oleate, Cocos Nucifera (Coconut) Milk Sodium Myristate, Sodium Chloride, Citric Acid, Glyceryl Laurate, Cocamidopropyl Betaine, Cocos Nucifera (Coconut) Oil, Sodium Thiosulfate, Sodium Citrate, Titanium Dioxide, Trisodium Sulfosuccinate, Tocopherol, Pentasodium Pentatate, Tetrasodium Etidronate

Johnson & Johnson Tear Free Baby Shampoo
INGREDIENTS: Aqua (Water), Cocamidopropyl Betaine, Decyl Glucoside, Sodium Cocoyl Isethionate, Lauryl Glucoside, PEG-80 Sorbitan Laurate, Glycerin, Citric Acid, Sodium Benzoate, PEG-150 Distearate, Sodium Methyl Cocoyl Taurate, Fragrance, Polyquaternium-10, Disodium EDTA

Question 3 Deborah – What are your thoughts on moisturisers formulated with elements that are found naturally in the skin (e.g. The Ordinary Natural Moisturising Factors + HA)? Specifically are these formulations better for damaged/sensitive skin?

What is it?
The NMF are components that your body naturally produces to keep your skin moisturized.  If you analyze the NMF you’ll see that it consists of about 40% amino acids, 12% sodium PCA, 12% lactate, about 8% sugars like glycerol, 7% urea, and a bunch of other stuff. NaPCA is really important because it helps the skin hold onto moisture.

Do products that include it work better? I don’t think so.

It makes for a good marketing story. If you like the products and what they do for your skin, then they are worth trying. But as far as moisturizing and making your skin feel better, there are better ingredients than what the skin produces naturally.

Question 4Paula asks, when looking for new products for myself and clients to help strengthen or moisturize hair, what are some ingredients I should look for? I have a brand I’ve used for years that I love and have always felt made a huge difference in my hair, but if I remember correctly, I looked the other day and it had glycerin & dimethicone high up on the list, which makes me think it’s just coating my hair. 

Glycerin and dimethicone are used in products for two different reasons. If you are using a rinse off product with glycerin, it is likely being rinsed off the hair and going down the drain. It’s kind of a waste to put in those types of products but brands do it anyway for various reasons. If you are using glycerin in a leave-on product, I do find that it can coat the hair and it leaves the hair feeling a little tacky. It’s certainly not harming the hair, because sometimes things coating the hair is a good thing. It increases lubricity helps with combing and reduces breakage. It’s about personal preference, and I just don’t like the feeling of glycerin being left on the hair.

Dimethicone use in formulations is complex. There are some really light weight dimethicones that provide good rinse-feel. These don’t remain on the hair, but rather either get rinsed down the drain or volatilize into the atmosphere. Then, you have the dimethicones that are heavier in weight and remain on the hair. These provide lubricity to the hair or make calming the hair a little bit easier. Or they can be used for anti-frizz or to weigh down the hair. The point is, you *want* them to coat the hair or they can’t do their job.

If you are looking for products to strengthen or moisturize the hair, I wouldn’t worry too much about the presence of glycerin or dimethicone as a deterrent. Do you want to look for products that contain protein, which is a form of scaffolding on the hair that acts as a strengthening network. Wheat protein is actually excellent for strengthening the hair. A lot of people worry about wheat protein having gluten, but the protein is hydrolyze, and therefore gluten is typically not detectable. If you have a concern about gluten and you see hydrolyzed wheat protein in a product you shouldn’t have to worry too. Additionally, some proteins like hydrolyzed soy protein can increase the moisture content of hair. You can also look for an ingredient like polyquaternium-37 which leaves the hair feeling really conditioned.

Follow the Beauty Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

{ 5 comments }

Welcome to the Beauty Brains, a show where real cosmetic chemists answer your beauty product questions and give you an insider’s look at the cosmetic industry. This is Episode 218.

Hosts: Valerie George and Perry Romanowski. 

On today’s show we’re going to be answering beauty questions about…

  • How do magnetic face masks work?
  • Do Rodan + Field products really live up to their claims?
  • Are Monat’s hair products really that special? 
  • Can Monat cleanser remove a marker mark?

Beauty Industry news

Most popular beauty products during quarantine

Recall alert

Wyndmere Naturals Recalls Birch Sweet Essential Oil and Aches & Pains Synergistic Essential Oil –  because it contains methyl salicylate which must be in child resistant packaging as required by the Poison Prevention Packaging Act (PPPA).  The product as packaged represents a poisoning danger if swallowed by small children. This is just another reminder that just because something is natural, that doesn’t mean it is safe!  

Beauty questions

Question 1 – Audio QuestionIrena – from Germany. I’ve seen a magnetic face mask. Is that something that works? The mask is supposed to absorb the gunk and the magnet pulls everything out of your pores. Does this work?

The main ingredient is iron powder. The rest of the mask is pretty standard. One that I saw from Dr Brandt had common skin care ingredients like Dimethicone, polysilicone, silica, peptides and a film forming polymer. You apply the mask, leave it on for 5-10 minutes, then remove it with an included magnet that you wrap in a tissue and glide over your face. This is purely a gimmick. The magnet is not pulling things out of your pores.

Question 2 – Nicole says, “Hi! I am wondering if you have ever looked into Rodan & Fields products to see if they really do what they claim. Specifically, the Reverse Regimen and Redefine Regimen. I have used both for at least 6mo each and saw good results, but it’s very expensive. Reverse claims to lighten hyperpigmentation, which it did lighten hyperpigmentation some and left my skin glowing. Redefine claims to lessen the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. While it did lessen the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, the price point is high and I am wondering if there is an alternative line that is cheaper with similar results? Thanks for looking into this! 

REVERSE – products

  • Exfoliating Wash $44
  • Intensive Brightening Toner $50
    • Kojic Acid, Salicylic Acid, Phenylethyl Resorcinol, Dipotassium Glycrrhizinate, Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Licorice) Root Extract
  • Dual Active Brightening Complex $102
    • Vitamin C Formula: Ethoxydiglycol, Ascorbic acid, Kojic acid, Syringa Vulgaris (Lilac) Leaf Cell Culture Extract
    • Retinol Formula: Retinol, Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Licorice) Root Extract, Dipotassium Glycyrrhizate
  • Reverse Broad Spectrum Sunscreen $43
    • ACTIVE INGREDIENTS: Avobenzone 3%, Homosalate 10%, Octisalate 5%, Octocrylene 2.6% Dipotassium Glycyrrhizate

REDEFINE – products The REDEFINE Regimen includes four products that together visibly improve fine lines, wrinkles and loss of firmness for younger-looking skin.

  • Redefine Daily Cleaning Mask $44
    • Sodium Lactate
  • Redefine Pore Minimizing Toner $50
    • Gluconolactone, Lactobionic Acid, Lens Esculenta (Lentil) Seed Extract, Sodium Hyaluronate, Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Licorice) Root Extract, Panax Ginseng Root Extract
  • Defense Treatment Broad Spectrum SPF 30 $87
    • ACTIVE INGREDIENTS: Avobenzone 3%, Homosalate 2.5%, Octisalate 5%, Octocrylene 2.7%
  • Overnight Restorative Cream $80
    • Niacinamide, Gluconolactone, Squalane, Tetrapeptide-21, Ascorbic Acid, Hydrolyzed Sericin, Hydrolyzed Silk, Retinyl Palmitate, Sodium Hyaluronate

Other suggestions:
Renee Rouleau – spa brand
Olay Regenerist
The Ordinary

Question 3 – Audio – Julia – you have way better arguments and research. Big fan. Monat global brand which is MLM. I tried products and they worked great for my curly hair. They make outrageous claims. Says no other shampoo can do that. What’s your take on this company and their claims? Is there truth in their claims?

Thanks for the question. I’ll say at the outset that I’m not a big fan of the MLM model. This is mostly because the vast majority of people who sell MLM products just end up losing money. But I will say, that just because I think the business strategy is a bit suspect, that doesn’t mean the products necessarily are. There are plenty of MLM companies that make good beauty products.

So, let’s dive into your question.  You said you tried the products and they worked great for your curly hair. That’s great. Now, you didn’t say specifically what product you tried and they only have one targeted to curly hair (their Curl Cream).  I was looking for the outrageous claims you mentioned but honestly, I didn’t see them. Here is what they say about the curl cream 

Defines and conditions all curl types, for frizz-free long-lasting, natural-looking, manageable tresses.

These are decidedly pedestrian claims that pretty much any brand can make.  And in looking at the product ingredient list, it features a styling polymer called Polyquaternium 72 made by a raw material company named Croda. It’s a perfectly fine polymer and they have evidence that in lab tests it provides a bit more hold than other styling polymers like the ever popular PVP. But there is nothing special about this product, its ingredient list or even its claims.  Everyone makes these same claims about their products. 

Now, you said their shampoo makes claims that no other shampoo can do. So, I looked at one of their shampoo products, and didn’t see anything special there either.  Their Advanced Hydrating shampoo is “sulfate free” and based on a couple Isethionate surfactants and a Betaine. This is not revolutionary technology. I don’t think it’s particularly impressive technology either but some people might like it. They do load it up with a bunch of oils which just makes the product worse at cleaning hair but some consumers and marketers think that oils in your shampoos is a good thing.  I don’t think it is. 

But honestly, they don’t even have any outrageous claims here. 

Sulfate-free, gentle cleanser. “Renews dehydrated hair with softness, elasticity, and shine.”  “Infuses hair with intense hydration.” “Improves manageability…” “Leaves hair soft and shiny.”  Pretty much every hair care product will make similar claims. 

They have their “feature” ingredients like REJUVENIQE® Oil which is just some blend of oils that is going to do pretty much what all the other oils do. Then this ingredient Capixyl which “helps to strengthen and thicken hair while supporting natural growth.”  Notice how weak the claim is? What does “supporting natural growth mean” or what does it mean to “help” strengthen hair? These claims are only meant to sound impressive. They really aren’t. 

In a video on their website they talk about restructuring hair from the inside out. But if you pay attention carefully to their claims, they are not making any claims that can’t be supported by any other product.  The bottom line is that while they likely make perfectly fine, albeit a bit overpriced, products, there is nothing special about them. You can go to Target and get products that work every bit as good (or even better) than Monat products. 

Yes, I think there is truth in the claims.  I didn’t see any false claims. I just also didn’t see any impressive claims. Mostly, these seem like pretty boring, standard hair products.

As far as what I think of the company…there are some things that cause me concern. First, I do object to the BS fear marketing they employ posting all the things that their products don’t include as if that somehow makes their products safer. They make claims about ingredients that are “toxic” which aren’t toxic or unsafe. This is pretty standard in the “clean beauty” movement though so they aren’t especially bad here. 

Article from Medium.com which reviewed the company 

Question 4  – Kimberly says, I’ve seen a few people that sell Monat put Sharpie on their face and remove it with their new makeup removing balm. What ingredient(s) would be in that to be able to remove a permanent marker? They’re super into marketing their products as all natural, and I don’t buy into that because they’re not all natural, and even if they were, I’m a believer that natural is a marketing gimmick. 

Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Isoamyl Laurate, C13-15 Alkane, PEG-20 Glyceryl Triisostearate, Polyethylene, Heptyl Undecylenate, Ethylhexyl Palmitate, Synthetic Wax, Calcium Silicate, Limnanthes Alba (Meadowfoam) Seed Oil, Crambe Abyssinica Seed Oil, Camellia Oleifera Seed Oil, Solanum Lycopersicum (Tomato) Seed Oil, Daucus Carota Sativa (Carrot) Seed Oil, Citrus Limon (Lemon) Peel Oil, Citrus Aurantifolia (Lime) Oil, Citrus Aurantium Bergamia (Bergamot) Fruit Oil, Adansonia Digitata Oil, Mauritia Flexuosa Fruit Oil, Cocos Nucifera (Coconut) Oil, Gardenia Taitensis Flower Extract, Moringa Oleifera Seed Oil, Caryocar Brasiliense Fruit Oil, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Olea Europaea (Olive) Fruit Oil, Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Extract, Mangifera Indica (Mango) Pulp Extract, Musa Sapientum (Banana) Pulp Extract, Saccharum Officinarum (Sugarcane) Extract, Glycolic Acid, Myrica Cerifera (Bayberry) Fruit Wax, Glycerin, Tocopherol, Silica, Aqua/Water/Eau, Ethylhexylglycerin, Benzyl Alcohol    

“Like dissolves like.”

Follow the Beauty Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

 

{ 0 comments }

On today’s show we’re going to be answering questions about…

  • Does Kiehls eye alert product help eyes look better?
  • What is the best product to use to avoid breakouts with anti-aging benefits?
  • What do you think of the technology of the new Victoria Beckham line?
  • What is the oldest beauty product on the market today?

Beauty Science

Fekkai launches new beauty technology to customize hair care

Take the Fekkai quiz

Beauty Questions

Question 1 – Audio Question – Frank O – This is about Kiehl’s Eye Alert product, which uses cucumber and alfalfa to energize the skin in eye area and vitamin E and caffeine to combat dark circles and puffiness. Do these do anything?

Question 2 – Norma Jean asks, “Can you tell me what you think of the following two products’ ingredients and which you’d recommend for sensitive skin that is avoiding breakouts and wants anti-aging? I love your podcast!

Question 3 – Audio – What do you think of the new Victoria Beckham and Augustinus Bader collaboration? Trisha – Victoria Beckam – TFC8 technology claims to create an optimal environment for the skin’s repair. It has a high price tag and is there evidence that it works?

Question 4Dear Beauty Brains, I love the show! I am currently reading War Paint about Helena Rubenstein and Elizabeth Arden. Apparently [they’re] the creators of fear mongering in cosmetic advertising. It’s got me wondering what are some of the oldest skincare products in their original formulas still in the market? Thanks for the info. Rhonda from California.

Follow the Beauty Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

{ 2 comments }

The Beauty Brains episode 216 featuring cosmetic chemists Valerie George and Perry Romanowski. 

Beauty questions covered today include: 

  • How do bond builders work? 
  • Is sodium coco sulfate more gentle than SLS?
  • Does men’s antiperspirant better than women’s?

Beauty Science

Avon launches a new CBD skin care line.

R+Co just launched a CBD

Beauty Questions

Question 1 – Sarah says – We used to carry system professional. The liquid treatment we sell. It is supposed to go in and place lipids in between protein links in hair. Does it have an advantage for hair?  How about Olaplex & Wellaplex? Do they help with the bond structure in hair?

Question 2 – Stephanie says – I’ve often read that Sodium Coco Sulfate is a gentler alternative to Sodium Lauryl Sulfate because it is derived from coconuts. I’m rather skeptical of this claim, since Sodium Lauryl Sulfate is also derived from coconut. I did some digging (a LOT of digging, there’s almost no unbiased information on sodium coco sulfate), and I found that the two also have the same CAS number of 151-21-3. I’m no chemist, but I’ve always understood that if the CAS number is the same, the chemical is the same.

Why are the cosmetic companies lying and trying to mislead us with sodium coco sulfate? Is it because of the bad rap that SLS has? Or am I missing something here about sodium coco sulfate?

Question 3 –  Sagebrush says – Does men’s deodorant work better than women’s?  Some of my friends think it does.

Follow the Beauty Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

{ 0 comments }

This is Episode 215. I’m your host, Perry Romanowski and with me today all the way from sunny California is Valerie George.  Hello Valerie!

We have a few interesting beauty questions to cover today, including:

  • Can the coronavirus survive on your hair?
  • What does it mean when a permanent color says it’s not for gray hair?
  • Can ingredient technology justify a price point?
  • Is carnauba wax bad for hair?
  • Does argan oil penetrate the hair shaft and do anything useful?

Beauty Science

Scientists discover bacteria that can eat plastic

Check out The Dream podcast

Beauty Questions

Question 1 – Patty – What is the potential of the virus sitting in hair? I don’t wash my hair daily. Would you recommend I wash my hair on a daily basis to combat the virus?

We’re not doctors and this isn’t really our area of expertise. 

This isn’t something that is necessarily known. The virus is so new that there hasn’t been a lot of research done on it. But viruses can live on hair. So, it’s not an unreasonable concern about having the virus build up on your hair. 

If you are not leaving the house you probably don’t have to worry about washing your hair. Unless someone in your house has the virus.

But, if you do go outside if you wanted to be ultra safe you should wash your hair.

It’s unlikely that you can spread the virus through it getting on your hair. You’d have to get it on your hair, then touch your hair, then touch your face, and that just isn’t a very efficient way to pick it up.  However, at least one healthcare expert says you should. Dr. Adam Friedman, the interim chair of dermatology at the George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, recommends daily hair washing during this pandemic.

Question 2 – Carolina asks – Hi Beauty Brains! Why is it that some permanent hair colors say that they are not for covering gray hair? I have been using L’oreal’s Feria, and it seems to cover my gray– though honestly, I don’t have a ton of gray yet. But I’m over 40; the writing is on the wall! I noticed that on the Loreal website, they recommend other lines (Superior Preference and Excellence) for covering gray. In general, what is different about dyes that are recommended for covering gray hair? I’m interested in using the least damaging product that works. Thanks!

Gray coverage occurs through a few mechanisms in hair color, but in speaking to the Feria and other L’Oreal products specifically…

Question 3 – Kara says – Hi there, I recently listened to your episode that addressed whether you could get ingredients of a “higher quality” which I found really interesting. I have read from some brands that they can justify a higher price point because of the “technologies” they use on the product rather than the ingredients. For example, a company might decrease the size of a hyaluronic acid molecule so that it can penetrate deeper into the skin and therefore be more effective. Is this true?

They can get patents on ingredient blends or even ingredients. L’Oreal has a patented sunscreen.  They can get different suppliers which might have higher “quality”  As a consumer though you can’t know. Any company can get access to most any other technology.

Question 4 – Hello Team, I recently started following you all. [I] thoroughly appreciate all the info you provide. My questions – how beneficial is carnauba wax for hair? Does it have a detrimental effect on hair? Having curly hair, I see this often in products I use. I’m curious because I also see it listed in my Meguire’s car wax too. Thanks, Glo.

Carnauba wax is a wax derived from a palm tree, Copernica cerifera, native to northeastern Brazil. The Dutch first talked about this tree in 1648, providing the first written description of the tree’s properties. The wax is harvested by plucking the leaves from the tree, drying it, and then beating the wax from the dried leaf. Some leaves are left on the tree to preserve the trees for the following season. The wax procured from the leaves is composed of free fatty alcohols and esters. It has one of the highest melting points of natural waxes used in personal care, with a melting point of 81-86ºC.

There are three grades of carnauba, each having to do with the purity of the wax. Typically the lightest color wax is used in personal care formulas. The high melting point provides formulations with the advantage of thermal stability, as it helps raise the overall melting point of a formulation. Carnauba wax is used in products where the product needs to be stiffer, thicker, or have better pickup. It’s also a good film-former, so it helps increase the shine of a product. That’s why you’ll fine carnauba wax in a floor or car polish, as well as candles, greases or other protective coatings. It also adds a little emolliency and skin protection properties. You’ll find it in lip balms for this purpose. 

A little carnauba is great in hair products because it can add some natural shine, but most importantly improve the rheology of your product. I can’t think if any negative impact on hair itself, other than it can be difficult to wash out of hair. However, I don’t think it’s used at such a high quantity that a good shampoo couldn’t get out of the hair.

Question 5 – Marius says – Does argan oil actually penetrate the hair shaft and does it do anything useful inside?

I haven’t seen any evidence that argan oil can penetrate hair. There was a study of coconut oil, sunflower oil and mineral oil to see how it affected hair. 

What are natural oils – Oils are combinations of fatty acids which have different lengths. Coconut oil is mostly C12, Sunflower oil is mostly C18 and mineral oil is mostly longer chain like C26 or more. Argan oil is mostly C18 so I’d expect it to behave most like Sunflower oil

At best it is going to coat the hair. It’s not going to significantly penetrate. Most products that use Argan oil use it as a claims ingredient. They rely on silicones to get the main benefits.

Follow the Beauty Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

{ 0 comments }

Welcome to the Beauty Brains, a show where real cosmetic chemists answer your beauty product questions and give you an insider’s look at the cosmetic industry. This is Episode 214. I’m your host, Valerie George and with me today is the most famous cosmetic chemist who already works from home, Perry Romanowski.  Hello Perry!

We have a few interesting beauty questions to cover today, including:

  • Does UV protection really work in hair?
  • What do we think of MLM companies? Are the products better & safer?
  • How do the Lionesse and Sudden Change eye creams work?
  • What’s the difference between high end lipstick & drug store products?

Beauty News

Receptivity to BS  predicts use of essential oils

Here’s a bit of research that may come as no surprise to followers of this show.  According to a study published in the most recent PLOS journal, people who are more receptive to believe  meaningless statements are more likely to use essential oils.

The best way to arm yourself against marketers who would have you spend a lot of money on a product that probably won’t work is to remain skeptical. If someone is financially benefiting from you believing something that they are telling you, you should get verification from some other, more unbiased source. You’ll be happier and certainly save some money.

PSA – Don’t make your own hand sanitizer!

Why?

  1. Most of the online recipes are not accurate. Adding thing like aloe gel & essential oils have not been tested for effectiveness. They very well can reduce the germ killing ability of the product. the FDA is very strict about its formulations for hand sanitizers. 
  2. Most people aren’t good at measuring or don’t have the right equipment. When we formulate we use a scale & measure everything in grams (weight). If you use volume measurements like cups or tablespoons, you won’t get the right ratios of ingredients. If you don’t get the right ratios of ingredients, you are deviating from that very specific recipe the FDA has set.
  3. It’s dangerous – This can give you a false sense of security, using a product that doesn’t work when you think it does. You’ll do more harm than good.

Wash your hands!

Beauty Questions

Question 1 – Vanessa – Does UV protection really work in hair?

Suppliers will tell you it does. I’m skeptical. 

We can’t measure UV protection for hair like we measure UV protection for skin. 

  • Effect of UV on hair damage (tryptophan cascade). 
  • Effect on hair color (degradation of the chromophores that color the hair). 

Common ingredients that formulators use to provide UV protection on the hair, and why that likely doesn’t work (shampoo/conditioners)

Question 2 – Claire asks – Is there a difference between high-end vs drugstore lip beauty products, specifically lipsticks? If so, what is the main difference?

Formulas are pretty much the same. I looked at Maybelline lipstick which costs about $3 a tube versus the Tom Ford lipstick which costs $55 a tube. Both use the same basic ingredients, a wax base candelilla & microcrystalline wax. And they both used the same basic colors. In the US & EU colorants have to be approved before being put into cosmetics so everyone has access to the same raw materials. From a formula standpoint, there isn’t a quality difference between the expensive and less expensive products. 

This doesn’t mean that if you try one of the products it’s going to feel exactly the same as the other. How it performs and feels is a personal preference. What I am saying is that there is no reason they couldn’t be made to feel & work exactly the same. There are no special ingredients that the expensive formula uses that the inexpensive formula couldn’t use. And from a cost of goods standpoint, the ingredients are pretty much going to be the same cost. 

The biggest difference is the brand name and the packaging.

Question 3Laura from Instagram asking about Lionesse and Sudden Change’s eye serums and their “superglue” effect on the skin. Which ingredients are doing that?

Sudden Change Undereye-Firming Serum – Ingredients: Water (Aqua), Serum Albumin, SD Alcohol 40, Dimethicone Copolyol, Hyaluronic Acid, Dextran Sulfate, Tetrasodium EDTA, Imidazolidinyl Urea, Quaternium-15, Methylparaben.

Lionesse Amber Eye Serum – Ingredients: Aqua, Propylene Glycol, Polysorbate 20, Palmitoyl Oligopeptide, Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide-7, Sodium Hyaluronate, Calendula Officinalis Flower Extract, Amber Powder, Camellia Sinensis Leaf Extract, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Extract, Ginkgo Biloba Leaf Extract, Pueraria Lobata Root Extract, Sodium PCA, Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein, Ascorbic Acid, Sclerotium Gum, Sodium Polystyrene Sulfonate, Allantoin, Glycerin, Butylene Glycol, Carbomer, Disodium EDTA, Triethanolamine, Ethylhexylglycerin, Phenoxyethanol.

Question 4  – Meredith – What do you think of MLM companies claiming to sell safer products. brands like Beautycounter. How do you respond to people who are trying to sell you MLM. What evidence can you provide for reasons not to buy?

No the products aren’t safer.

From a formulation standpoint these products aren’t better than what you can get in the store

They generally cost more & do not work better.

For many brands the MLM marketing model is little more than a pyramid scheme.

According to research done by the Federal Trade Commision, 99% of people who sell for MLMs lose money, so only 1% of people will turn a profit. For comparison, people who start their own business turn a profit about 39% of the time. Less than 50% but still 39 times better than if you sell through an MLM.

As you might imagine, I’m not a fan of the MLM model.

Follow the Beauty Brains

Thanks for listening. Hey if you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

{ 0 comments }

We have a lot of beauty questions to answer today, including:

  • What do we think of the Beverly Hills MD brow serum
  • Are lash tints safe?
  • Why do anti-aging ingredients affect skin color?
  • Why do dermatologists keep saying hyaluronic acid is pointless?

Perry and Valerie are under self imposed quarantine!  But we’re still recording. 

Beauty science news

Are cosmetics going to be more regulated?

The spokesperson from the EWG (who likes this new legislation by the way) said the following about the cosmetics industry.  “…no category of consumer products is subject to less government oversight than cosmetics and other personal care products.”  This is patently false. The least regulated, and in my view most dangerous, consumer product segment is the Supplement Industry. Congress passed the DSHEA act in 1994 which essentially took all the power the FDA had to regulate the supplement industry and put it in the hands of the supplement industry. I have zero faith in the quality of supplements. 

I still wonder why there isn’t a “Campaign for Safe Supplements.”

Beauty Questions

Question 1 – Diana says – Hi there! I just bought this after getting really mesmerized by the infomercial, and of course after I received it I’m wondering are any of these ingredients dangerous? I knew it might not be as effective as they promise, but I didn’t think about potential harm… do you mind taking a look? 

https://beverlyhillsmd.com/product/thick-full-brow-enhancing-serum/

Does it work? 

Well, first I’m never terribly impressed with the scientific validity of supplier funded research. They have a vested interest in exaggerating outcomes and ignoring things that don’t support their marketing story. They also aren’t under the same advertising rules that they would be if consumers were the customer. Symrise or Givaudan can make much more impressive claims than P&G or Unilever.

But for a small start-up company, they can just go to a supplier and ask them for something that can grow hair, and put it in. They probably don’t do any testing themselves and just use the product because the supplier says it works.  And if you’re selling online and advertising through infomercials, you can be a lot more loosey goosey with your claims. 

Of course, looking at their website they do a pretty good job of writing claims. They give the impression of this product working like a drug, but they don’t make any direct claims about it. For example, they say “..this formula helps support the stem cells present in your hair follicles, which control hair growth — so you can achieve the look of fuller, thicker brows without the need for excess makeup or microblading.

I mean the claim “formula helps support stem cells” is vague. What does it mean to “support the stem cells”?

Importantly though, nowhere do they say that the product will make your hair grow. 

So, I doubt you are going to see any real benefit to this product beyond some film forming that makes your brows maybe more noticeable.

And to the question of safety, this product is probably safe, at least as far as the ingredients go. I wouldn’t worry about product safety. I’d be more worried about spending $88 for less than 1 ounce of product!  Geez! 

Ingredient list – Deionized Water, Myristoyl Pentapeptide-17, Glycerin, Butylene Glycol, Trifolium Pratense (Clover) Flower Extract, Acetyl Tretrapeptide-3, Dextran, Larix Europaea (Larch) Wood Extract, Sodium Metabisulfite (Antioxidant), Glycine (Amino Acid), Zinc Chloride, Camellia Sinensis (Green Tea) Leaf Extract, Magnolia Officinalis Bark Extract, Glyceryl Caprylate, Propanediol (Non-GMO), Psidium Guajava Leaf Extract, Polysorbate-20, Keratin, PEG-12 Dimethicone, Sodium Hyaluronate, Ammonium Acryloyldimethyltaurate/VP Copolymer, Panthenol (Pro-Vitamin B5), Lecithin, Pullulan, Sclerotium Gum, Xanthan Gum, Allantoin, Cetraria Islandica (Icelandic Moss) Extract, Keratin Amino Acids, Biotin, Pyrus Malus (Apple) Fruit Extract, Ricinus Communis (Castor) Seed Oil

Question 2Han from Instagram says, “Hi! I’ve been listening to the podcast for quite a while but only just found you on Instagram. Just listened to the episode about lash lifts… which made me wonder, are lash tints very safe or do they have different dangers?”

Is it safe? In Europe, silver nitrate is approved up to 4% in eye lash tints. A small selection of oxidative color is approved for use in dying eyebrows and eyelashes as well, but a majority of the colorants that you can use on head are not approved for use on the brow or lash. This is important for keeping in mind, to our EU listeners, that you should not take any hair color for the head and just put it on your brows or lashes because they don’t have the established safety. In the US, there are not any colorants approved for use in the lash area.

This is why the state of California does not allow eye lash tinting as a salon service, because there are no authorized colorants for the lash area, therefore there can’t be any products with approved colorants, therefore there are no approved products. Additionally, just because a colorant is approved for use in the eye area, doesn’t mean you are without risk; colorants are sensitizers and people can be allergic to them, just like hair dye. It’s important to patch test 48 hours before using eye lash tint to ensure no allergies exist. Additionally, permanent eyelash and eyebrow tints and dyes have been known to cause serious eye injuries, including blindness. 

Question 3 – Audio QuestionLisa asks – Hi! I have three questions. First, I wondered why is it that anti-aging ingredients: retinoids, niacinamide, and Vitamin C, also inhibit or reduces melanin in your skin? I’m a really pale untanned Fitzpatrick type II, and I appreciate every melanin molecule in my skin, personally. My second question is why aren’t there more retinaldehyde products out there? Are they really expensive to produce, or really photosensitive, or? And my final question is: Is PPD the best indication of UVA protection? I’m looking for a sunscreen with really high UVA protection, so should I be buying a sunscreen with PPD 30+ or a sunscreen with 5 Boots stars, for example? Or should I find a sunscreen with so-and-so UV filters? Thank you for listening to my questions!” 

  1. Anti-aging ingredients shouldn’t have too much impact on skin color
  2. Retinaldehyde doesn’t have a huge impact on skin appearance so it’s not used as much.
  3. The Boots Star rating with 5 stars and an SPF of 30 is the best to use.

Question 4 – MaskinRelaxin asks “Why do dermatologists say that hyaluronic acids are pointless? I was told that the molecule is too big to be able to penetrate into the skin.”

Maybe because most are too large to significantly penetrate the skin and they stay on top. Or maybe it’s because it doesn’t work better than glycerin. Or maybe it’s because they want to do injections instead of topical treatments.

Follow the Beauty Brains

Thanks for listening. If you get a chance can you go over to iTunes and leave us a review. That will help other people find the show and ensure we have a full docket of beauty questions to answer.

ASK A QUESTION – If you want to ask a question click this link or record one on your phone and send it to thebeautybrains@gmail.com

Social media accounts
on Instagram we’re at thebeautybrains2018
on Twitter, we’re thebeautybrains
And we have a Facebook page.

Support the Beauty Brains!
The Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! Help support us to continue to make episodes.

Thanks again for listening and remember Be Brainy about your Beauty

{ 2 comments }